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Pro-democracy candidates, from left, Lam Cheuk-ting, Alvin Yeung Ngok-kiu, Raymond Chan Chi-chuen, Fernando Cheung and Leung Kwok-hung celebrate after winning seats at the legislative council elections in Hong Kong on Sept. 5, 2016.
Pro-democracy candidates, from left, Lam Cheuk-ting, Alvin Yeung Ngok-kiu, Raymond Chan Chi-chuen, Fernando Cheung and Leung Kwok-hung celebrate after winning seats at the legislative council elections in Hong Kong on Sept. 5, 2016.

Pro-democracy Hong Kong lawmakers defy China during swearing-in

HONG KONG – A swearing-in ceremony to kick off Hong Kong’s legislative session descended into farce Wednesday as newly elected pro-democracy lawmakers intentionally mangled their oaths in a show of defiance against Beijing.

They displayed flags declaring that Hong Kong is not a part of China and called out for “democratic self-determination” for the semiautonomous Chinese city the oath taking session.

The antics foreshadow what’s expected to be a chaotic term for Hong Kong’s legislature after a group of youthful candidates were elected in September, adding to the opposition’s numbers in the semi-democratic Legislative Council.

The freshman lawmakers represent some of the new wave of grassroots groups that emerged from the wake of 2014’s massive pro-democracy street protests.

Sixtus Leung, 30, of the Youngspiration party draped a blue flag with the words “Hong Kong is not China” over his shoulders and crossed his fingers as he held a Bible while he spoke. His colleague Yau Wai-ching laid the same flag on the table in front of her when it was her turn.

They recited the oath in English but appeared to deliberately mispronounce the word China as Shina , an old fashioned Japanese term for the country that some see as derogatory.

Yau, 25, also appeared to insert a curse word into her oath.

The legislative clerk admonished them for not sticking to the proper wording and refused to accept their oaths.

Another lawmaker, Lau Siu-lai, who founded her own party, Democracy Groundwork, recited the oath very slowly. She took about 10 minutes to repeat the declaration, which has less than 100 words, by pausing for a few seconds after each word, as the rest of the council chamber listened in silence.

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